Code For Life is a non profit initiative that delivers free, open-source games that help all students learn computing.

13%

of university computer science graduates in the UK are women*. We want both boys and girls to feel inspired and confident about technology from a young age.

100,000

Registered users across the world, and growing everyday.

2014

The year that computing was added to the UK curriculum. We’ve been supporting teachers and students ever since.

Ocado Technology

Ocado Technology develops the innovative software and hardware that powers the online retail platforms of Ocado.com (the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer) and Morrisons (the UK's fourth largest supermarket chain).

Our technology estate is very broad and deep, covering real-time control systems and robotics, computer vision systems, machine learning and AI, simulation, data science, forecasting and routing systems, inference engines, cloud, IoT, big data and more.

In partnership with teachers

The Ocado Technology Code for Life resources are designed for, and tested by, primary school teachers.

Our aim is to teach children the basic principles of coding, to help them flourish in an increasingly digital world. And in the coming years, we’ll extend our resources to support pupils throughout their school career and beyond.

We couldn’t do it without you!

Our team and volunteers

The Code for Life site and Rapid Router app would not have been possible without the time and skills volunteered by our talented developers and creatives.

Thank you, Ana Crisan, Anders Schuller, Andre Gomes, Andreia Silva Cabecinhas, Andrew Miller, Angela Brownsey, Anne Marie Neatham, Aparbek Smailov, Ashley Marshall, Barry Parker, Ben Cardy, Blazej Strozewski, Bree King, Celine Boudier, Cherie Pun, Chris Leach, Chris Mukherjee, Chris Pavli, Christopher Brett, Cliford Bailey, Daniel Palma, Daniela Ortner, Dawid Chodura, Duncan Russell, Edd Armitage, Felix Stephenson, Florian Aucomte, Helen Mead, Isabel Richards, Jacq Train, James Dimmock, James Holland, James Smyth, Javi Carretero, Joe Slade, Joseph Zammit, Josh Blake, Katarzyna Zych, Kenny MacMillan, Kristian Brugts, Lloyd Allen, Lukasz Brzezowski, Maciej Zywiol, Mahana Clutha, Marcin Zieba, Maria Skrzypek, Mateusz Gizycki, Matt Whelan, Matthew Daggitt, Menelik Collymore, Michael Storey, Miguel Trigueira, Mike Bryant, Nel Sui, Niket Shah, Oliver Cartz, Oliver Jeeves, Patricia Botta, Paul Clarke, Paul Heideman, Paul Wright, Paulina Koch, Peter Hancock, Piotr ‘Kru’ Kaczmar, Piotr Repetowski, Rachel Lord, Rafal Wawryk, Robert Brignull, Ruth Wall, Shubham Jain, Sophie Whelan, Steph Lovis, Stephen Kennedy, Thomas Cassany, Tricy Dino, Varadh Kalidasan, Wael Al Jeshi, Will Peck, Yongji Zhou.

Want to get involved?

We are open source, so anyone can ask to contribute. You can play with game-running JavaScript, Python/Django, animation using SVG and Raphael, and a lot more. We’d like input from all sorts of backgrounds, whether you’re: a programmer looking for a creative outlet; a teacher hoping to shape the resources; a polyglot who’d like to help with translation; or even a pupil putting your skills to the test.

Developers

To contribute, head over to GitHub, check out the issue tracker, and get started. There you can suggest new features or assign yourself an issue to develop (you’ll find more info about how to do this on GitHub).

Teachers, parents, and creatives

Please get in touch through our contact form and let us know how you would like to get involved.

We would like to thank our friends who have contributed to this initiative

10x logo BCS logo Imperial logo Barefoot logo MC Saatchi logo HOPE logo GLA logo Pressure Cooker logo

10X, BCS Academy of Computing, Barefoot Computing, Computing at School, The National Museum of Computing, Imperial College London, M&C Saatchi, Alvaro Ramirez, Jason Fingland, Ramneet Loyall, Sharon Harrison, Keith Avery, Dale Coan, Rob Whitehouse, Mandy Nash, Tanya Nothard, Matt Trevor, Moy El-Bushra, Richard Siwiak, Peter Tondrow, Liz Pratt, Pressure Cooker Studios, GAL Education, Hope Education.

Dedicated to Sharon Harrison

Sharon Harrison portrait

1956 — 2015

Sharon was instrumental in helping to create Code for Life. At the beginning of 2014 she was recruited to act as our Educational Consultant. The project drew on her previous skills as a pioneering computing teacher and education consultant.

Sharon has left a lasting legacy by creating something which will help teach STEM skills to the next generation of computer scientists across the world.